Senior News in Johnson County

Local seniors sport Silver Sneakers custom shirts at the Johnson County Senior Center.

By Meg Dickens

Seniors at the Johnson County Senior Center are always active. They are difficult to keep up whether they are taking trips, dancing, or celebrating each day and holiday. Perhaps the local health programs help. Silver Sneakers is a special, low-impact exercise program that is perfect for group exercise.

Mary Swanson created the program in 1992 after her father had a heart attack that made him want to focus more on living healthy. These exercises focus on helping seniors stay fit in a three-step cycle; warm up, winding up, and cooling down. The program focuses on the feet, legs, hips, waist, arms, neck, and head. Silver Sneakers allows for modified routines to prevent injuries.

Instructors come to the center on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10 am to 10:45 am each week. Silver Sneakers instructors Mary Robinson, Jo Caraway, and Wendy Laumer rotate classes. Common gear includes weights, bands, and balls. The center provides all of this equipment, and there is no charge to participate.

The senior center has custom Silver Sneakers shirts with the tagline “Fitness. Fun. Friends.” Many seniors make new friends while working on fitness to accompanying music. It is not limited to seniors either. Anyone can attend this free program to better their health.

Silver Sneakers is not just for physical health. Participants can socialize and make friends. This can greatly improve mental health. Mental and physical health are closely intertwined. Take care of both physical and mental health to live a long and healthy life. The members of the Johnson County Senior Center are a good example.

For more information about senior center and its events, contact Kathy Motsinger at 727-8883. Event calendars and the daily menu can be picked up at the Center. The Johnson County Senior Center is a multi-purpose center in Mountain City, TN that provides a variety of services for people 60 and older.

Keywood Animal Clinic to conduct breeding soundness test

By Sarah Ransom

The University of Tennessee/Tennessee State University is partnering with Tri-State and Keywood Animal Clinic to conduct a Breeding Soundness Exam for local cattlemen on Saturday, March.
The exam is scheduled to be held at the Johnson County Livestock Association Cattle Handling Facility located inside the Chamber Park in Doe.
Suzanne Robinson from Keywood Animal Clinic is coming to conduct the bull’s breeding soundness tests.
Testing bulls can help reduce the risk of spreading unwanted diseases or genetic issues and help increase higher pregnancy rates to help with cattle production and increased profit.
According to the University of Tennessee’s Extension Veterinarian, Lew Stickland, “failure to properly evaluate bulls before and during the breeding season can result in huge economic losses…a bull’s fertility can be considered fertile, sub-fertile, or sterile.”
The cost of testing is $45.00 per bull.
However, Tri-State Growers Co-Op is providing a $10 sponsorship per bull to help cover part of the cost for testing. The testing fee is $35 per bull.
Once the test is complete, all bulls that receive a satisfactory score for breeding purposes will also receive vaccinations and deworming at no additional cost.
BVD-PI testing is also available for an additional $15, and it is a great deal for those hoping to breed their bull this season.
Tests are scheduled through the UT/TSU Extension office that can be reached at (423)-727-8161. Those interested can stop by the office, located at 212 College Street.
For more information or additional questions, please contact the Extension office.
UT Extension serves the citizens of Johnson County with educational programs in the areas of Agriculture, Family and Consumer Sciences, Community Resource Development, and 4-H Youth Development.
The office has a wealth of research-based publications, addressing virtually any issue related to the home or farm.
Johnson County 4-H is the largest youth serving organization in the county working with 900-1,000 youth annually in grades 4-12. The Mountain City
office is an outreach branch of the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture and Tennessee State University, providing research-based solutions and information to the citizens of Tennessee.
Extension is an educational organization, funded by federal, state and local governments, that brings research-based information about agriculture, family and consumer sciences, resource development and youth to the people of Tennessee.

Micah West is student of the week at Laurel Elementary

Micah West is a second grader at Laurel
Elementary School, who enjoys learning about
significant individuals in American History like Dr.Seuss and George Washington. Micah lives at home with his parents Nathan and Amy West and his sister, Lily. He enjoys playing in the woods, jumping on his trampoline, and cooking and wants to be a chef.
Congratulations Micah. Photo submitted

Micah West is a second grader at Laurel
Elementary School, who enjoys learning about
significant individuals in American History like Dr.Seuss and George Washington. Micah lives at home with his parents Nathan and Amy West and his sister, Lily. He enjoys playing in the woods, jumping on his trampoline, and cooking and wants to be a chef.
Congratulations Micah. Photo submitted

Brookanna is Good Neighbor for February 2019

Johnson County Middle School student Brookanna Hutchins, center, smiles while recieving a recognition of being named Good Neighbor for February, 2019 from Dr. Bob Heath, Principal of JCMS, and Sheila Cruse, representing Gamma Mu. Photo submitted

By Tamas MondovicsJohnson County Middle School student Brookanna Hutchins was recently notified that she has been named the Good Neighbor for February, 2019.
The award is sponsored by the local chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma International.
According to officials
the Good Neighbor Award recognizes students in the Middle School who demonstrate a roster of exemplary traits and qualities such as neighborliness through exemplary kindness and respect, as well as an awareness of when others need help and a willingness to offer whatever assistance is needed.
The award honors a
generosity of spirit and the ability to put others’ needs before themselves.
Brookanna’s teachers describe her as a role model for teammates who play on the volleyball and basketball teams as well as being kind and helpful to all fellow students and teachers.
She makes good grades and serves on the Student Council, as well as enjoying many other activities at the school.
Dr. Bob Heath, Principal of JCMS, was joined by Sheila Cruse, representing Gamma Mu, to present a letter of congratulations to Brookanna.

Johnson becomes NTHS inductee

Johnson County resident Samantha Johnson, smiles after her induction into the National Technical
Honor Society last month. Thirty-five students at the
Tennessee College of Applied Technology were
inducted while membership is limited to students with a 95
overall grade point average and no attendance violations who are nominated by a faculty member. For additional
information, contact TCAT Elizabethton at 543-0070 or visit www.tcatelizabethton.edu. Photo submitted

Johnson County resident Samantha Johnson, smiles after her induction into the National Technical Honor Society last month.

Thirty-five students at the Tennessee College of Applied Technology were inducted while membership is limited to students with a 95 overall grade point average and no attendance violations who are nominated by a faculty member.

For additional
information, contact TCAT Elizabethton at 543-0070 or visit www.tcatelizabethton.edu. Photo submitted

Three-day 2019 Bassmaster Classic compete for $1 million in prizes

Fishermen crowd the playing field during a recent tourney. The 2019 Bassmaster Classic is scheduled to be held in Tennessee. Photo courtesy of Bassmaster.com

By Tamas Mondovics

The “Super Bowl of Bass Fishing” featuring fifty-two of the world’s best bass anglers will be competing for more than $1 million in prizes in the 2019 Bassmaster Classic scheduled for this weekend.
For the first time, the 49th annual world championship of bass fishing is being held at the birthplace of the Tennessee River, forming at the confluence of the Holston and French Broad Rivers in Knoxville.
“Tennessee bass fishing is legendary, and our friends at B.A.S.S. could not have picked a better place for the Bassmaster Classic,” says Frank Fiss, Chief of Fisheries Management for TWRA.
There are more than a million people that take at least one fishing trip a year in Tennessee and spend money along the way too.
Fishing is reportedly creating more than $1 billion of economic impact in Tennessee each year.
Anglers will battle-it-out for the title of 2019 Bassmaster Champion on Fort Loudoun and Tellico Reservoirs, as well as adjacent portions of the Tennessee and Little Tennessee Rivers beginning on Friday, March 15 and will run through Sunday, March 17, 2019.
According to tourney organizers competitors may fish either lake and anywhere along the Tennessee River upstream from Ft. Loudoun Dam to the I-40 bridge on the Holston River, and the Hwy. 168 bridge on the French Broad River. In total, anglers will enjoy over 30,000 surface acres of fishable water.
The three-day event kicks off each morning at 7:40 a.m. when the anglers launch at Volunteer Landing in downtown Knoxville.
Daily weigh-ins will be held in Thompson-Boling Arena on the University of Tennessee campus each afternoon at 3:15 p.m.
“We are very excited to host the Super Bowl of bass fishing and hope everyone will come out and experience the event and visit the
TWRA booth at the expo,” Fiss said.
Following the event, since all the fish will be released back into the lake, visitors can fish where the pros fished and even catch the same fish the pros caught.
With a colossal event only a few days away, Fiss emphasized that fishing is not only a wonderful recreational pastime; it is also a powerful driver of providing jobs and economic impact in Tennessee and said, “Tournaments like the Bassmaster Classic are easy to see the impact of bringing in 100,000 people for a weekend to stay and play.”
For more information about the 2019 Bassmaster Classic visit www.bassmaster.com/tournaments/2019.

Atwood tabbed Three-Rivers player of the year

Blake Atwood was voted Three Rivers’ Conference Player of the year by the league coaches.

By Scoop Christian

Johnson County was rewarded for winning a share of the Three Rivers Conference by the coaches at their recent meeting. The Longhorns placed four players on the squad and one gathered the highest honor.
Blake Atwood was named the 2018-19 player of the year. The Mr. Basketball finalist averaged more than 27 points per game and nearly seven rebounds.
The Longhorns reached the sub-state round before losing to Knox Fulton.
Seniors Gavin Reece, Zach Eller and Troy Arnold all joined Atwood on the elite squad. Reece and Eller both averaged over 11 points per game while Arnold was the blue collar guy who did all the dirty work inside.
Johnson County’s Austin Atwood and Elizabethton’s Lucas Honeycutt shared coach of the year honors.
Taylor Cox was the lone Lady Longhorn to be chosen on the girls’ team.

Three-Rivers All-conference

Boys
Player of the Year
Blake Atwood, Johnson County
Underclassman of the Year
Parker Hughes, Elizabethton
Co-Coaches of the Year
Austin Atwood, Johnson County;
Lucas Honeycutt, Elizabethton

Gavin Reece, Johnson County
Zack Eller, Johnson County
Troy Arnold, Johnson County
Nico Ashley, Elizabethton
Dustin Bartley, Sullivan East
Chase Bowery, Sullivan South
Bryce Carter, Happy Valley
Ben Diamond, Sullivan South
Dayne Davis, Sullivan East
Adam Davison, Sullivan East
Cole Layne, Sullivan South
Evan Perkins, Elizabethton
Brock Thompson, Unicoi County
Ben Williams, Sullivan Central
Eric Wilson, Elizabethton

Girls
Player of the Year
Abbey Crawford, Sullivan Central
Newcomer of the Year
Riley Nelson, Sullivan East
Coach of the Year
Kristi Walling, Sullivan Central

Taylor Cox, Johnson County
Hayley Grubb, Sullivan East
Alex Harris, Sullivan South
Kaylee Hendrickson, Unicoi County
Adrienne Henegar, Happy Valley
Mollie Leslie, Sullivan South
Riley Nelson, Sullivan East
Chloe Power, Unicoi County
Peyton Sams, Sullivan Central
Kaylen Shell, Elizabethton
Shay Whitson, Happy Valley

A.C.T.I.O.N. Coalition to host first quarterly Community ACTION meeting

By Tamas Mondovics

A.C.T.I.O.N Coalition, a local organization that works to create a positive environment for young people by providing positive youth development activities, will be hosting its first evening Community ACTION meeting.
The event is scheduled for Tuesday, March 26, will be the first quarterly evening community meeting, at the First Christian Church Life Center from 6-8p.m to provide the community with information.
“Our goal is to get more parents and students and community members involved in the work of the coalition and to gain their insight and input as to how we can best serve our community needs in regard to Substance Use Disorders (SUD) and the ongoing fight against the opioids crisis in our region,” said A.C.T.I.O.N Coalition, Executive Director Trish Burchette.
The Rural Opioids Response Program grantees from Ballad Heath are partnering with ACTION for this first meeting, which is said to begin by providing some general information about how ACTION, located at 138 East Main Street in Mountain City, TN is working in the community at this time and the services we are offering for Johnson County.
“This is a great opportunity for the community to meet with the Rural Communities Opioids Response Program grantees as they seek input from our community as to how this grant funding could help as outlined below,” Burchette said.
Attendees will enjoy some refreshments, and we will have time for questions and concerns to address.
The Rural Communities Opioids Response Program grantees are promising a well-rounded discussion during its portion of the informative meeting for the entire community with the goal of accomplishing a number of main objectives.

Such objectives include:
1. Gain community input on the opioids crisis and identify opportunities and gaps in Opioids Use Disorder (OUD) prevention, treatment (including Medication Assisted Treatment, MAT), and or recovery workforce, services, and access to care.
2. Use the information gained from these meetings to determine what existing federal, state, and local Opioids Use Disorder (OUD) resources could be leveraged within the rural community along with what new ones should be evaluated in the strategic planning process.
3. Overview of the project, a summary of why community input is being sought, education on some statistics of the opioids problem in this area, and education concerning common myths around Opioids Use Disorder (OUD).
4. Identify two goals to combat the morbidity and mortality of opioids use disorder in Johnson County/identify two initiatives per goal/identify 2 action items per initiative/identify resources needed/identify general feelings surrounding MAT
All community members who are interested in the opioids epidemic are urged to attend.
“ACTION Coalition and members of the Rural Communities Opioids Response Program grantees want to learn from the community,” Burchette said. “Any level of participation is appreciated and voluntary.”
For more information, please visit www.actioncoalition.org.

Bird feed month

Seniors celebrated National Bird Feeding Month by creating simple birdfeeders with pinecones, peanut butter, and twine. Mary Gale donated the pinecones and helped seniors with the project.

Seniors celebrated National Bird Feeding Month by creating simple birdfeeders with pinecones, peanut butter, and twine. Mary Gale donated the pinecones and helped seniors with the project.

Senior News

Below: Local billiard players at the Johnson County Senior Center prepare for the upcoming spring tournament. Men and women will compete in separate divisions, and there will be an 8 Ball Winner Title in each division.

National Bird Month can benefit avian and human health

By Meg Dickens

Pets combat loneliness and stress. These health benefits make pet ownership a highly attractive idea, and pets need people just as much as we need them. National Bird Feeding Month is the perfect time to makes a few feathered friends.

National Bird Feeding Month originates with Illinois Congressman John Porter. Porter made the proclamation on February 23, 1994. This makes National Bird Feeding Month a national event. It is supported by bird supports groups of all sizes, such as the National Bird-Feeding Society (NBFS) and the Wild Bird Centers of America.

“Individuals are encouraged to provide food, water, and shelter to help wild birds survive,” said Porter. “This assistance benefits the environment by supplementing wild bird’s natural diet of weed seeds and insects.”

This time of year is especially rough for backyard birds. Food supplies dwindle throughout the winter, and snow covers quite a bit of the remaining food. Experts suggest offering birdseed. This food source is high in energy. Birds will return to the food source, which creates an opportune time to bird watch.

Bird watching and feeding are common hobbies for all ages. Approximately one-third of the U.S. adult population choose to participate. This number is significantly larger in seniors.

This hobby can be a great topic of conversation. The National Audubon Society coordinates a free citizen-science project event called the Great Backyard Bird Count. Have fun while helping scientists better understand bird migrations and populations.

Enjoy National Bird Feeding Month and remember just how important it is to care for nature and for yourself. Find tips on how to best prepare your property for birds at Kaytee.com.

Seniors on the move

Right: Dennis and Barbara Henson were crowned King and Queen of the Johnson County Senior Center Valentines Ball on Friday, February 15. The sweet couple pose after their crowning.

Doe Elementary Leaders of the Week

 

Doe Elementary School celebrated the weekly recognition of its leaders. The students earned the spotlight this week included Joey Curran, Skyelyn Lawley, Allie Russom Dylan Canter, Brylan Walton, Mikayla Griffith, Carlie Dunn. The students are encouraged to work hard set the example and enjoy the photo op. Photo submitted

Library to host Spanish/English Conversation Group

The Johnson County Library is pleased to announce to welcome Comuniquemos, a Spanish/English conversation group beginning this month.
Classes are held at 6 p.m. in the North Wing of the Johnson County Public Library.
The group is open to anyone who is interested in practicing and improving either Spanish or English language skills. Jennifer Gillenwater, retired JCHS Spanish teacher, will be the group facilitator, helping the group transition from Spanish to English and providing it with the weekly theme.
The group will meet for one hour – the 1st half hour will be in English and the 2nd half in Spanish, or vice versa, depending on the group’s needs.
Native speakers of Spanish and English are needed and all levels are welcome.
Plan to join us the 1st and 4th Tuesday of each month for this low-stress, fun way to get to know each other and hone our language skills.
Bring notebook and pen and arrive a little early to sign in. For more information, call 768-0530.

Adobe Creative Cloud certification courses available at ETSU

 

By Tamas Mondovics
East Tennessee State University’s Office of Professional Development and Department of Media and Communication (MDCM) was pleased to announce the start of spring courses and testing leading to professional certification in Adobe Creative Cloud
programs this month.
According to ETSU officials, MDCM has positioned itself as a thought leader in digital literacy, curriculum design and experiential learning since 2011, when the department started integrating Adobe Creative Cloud software directly into the curriculum.
“Adobe Creative Cloud is the industry standard for multimedia production ad design software,” said Dr. Anthony Mitchell of ETSU’s Department of Media and Communication.
Beginning in March, opportunities for the public to earn the Adobe Certified Associate (ACA) credential in one or more Creative Cloud programs, which include Premiere Pro, Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign will be available.
In a recent release officials said that the ACA credential is the industry-recognized indicator of technical proficiency and expertise in multimedia production and software.
“The ACA credential is recognized by Fortune 500 companies as the indicator of technical proficiencies and expertise in that suite of products,” Mitchell said,
adding that educators, creative professionals, businesses, nonprofits, and anyone that does any kind of digital design, marketing, advertising, PR, video production, photography, etc., will benefit from ACA certification.
The one-day intensive, workshop-style courses are taught by ACA-certified
industry professionals and are delivered on-ground on Fridays from 2-6:30 p.m. in room 419 of Warf-Pickel Hall on the ETSU campus.
Participants have the option to take the certification exam at the end of the day on Friday or return to complete it the following morning on Saturday.
The first course on March 8 leads to ACA certification in Premiere Pro, the second on March 15 to certification in Photoshop and the third on March 22 to
certification in InDesign.
Additional courses are listed online at www.etsu.edu/cas/mcom.
The $425 course fee includes instruction, print and digital materials, practice exam, certification exam, option for one exam retake, and the ACA certificate itself upon successful completion of the exam.
“To be competitive in the global, digital marketplace, professionals must stay up-to-date on the tools used by industry leaders,” Mitchell said. “We provide the opportunity for people in our region to access to these courses at an affordable price, and offer a unique value proposition since the program is delivered by ETSU.”
To register or for more information, call Professional Development at 1-800-222-3878 or visit www.etsu.edu/professionaldevelopment.
For disability accommodations, call the ETSU
Office of Disability Services at
423-439-8346.

Johnson County students make history at Vex Robotics State Competition

Johnson County High and Middle School students pose for a photo last weekend while competing at the VEX State Championships in Brentwood, TN. The students enjoyed the spotlight after a strong performance that
qualified team 63303A to compete in the upcoming VEX World Championship Tournament in KY. Photo submitted

Johnson County High School Robotics Team 63303A Dalton Sluder, Jackson Mays, Ryan Bilodeau and Lauren Paterson . Photo submitted

By Tamas Mondovics

Under the direction and watchful eyes of coaches Kasi Dishman and Rebecca Byers, Johnson County High and Middle School students made history last weekend while participating in the 2019 VEX State Championships in Brentwood, TN.
Johnson County High School Team 63303A, comprised of Lauren Paterson, Dalton Sluder, Ryan Bilodeau, and Jackson Mays competed against 42 teams and was awarded the Design Award, qualifying their team for a spot at the VEX High School World Championship Tournament in Louisville, KY on April 24-27.
“Congratulations is due team 63303A and all of the Johnson County Robotics teams on a great season,” Dishma said.
Dishman explained that five teams from Johnson County qualified through their performances and awards at regional tournaments throughout the year to compete at last week’s tourney.
Two teams from the middle school competed against 23 other middle school teams and three teams from the high school competed against 42 teams from across the state of TN.
Gearing up for the next level of cometition is by no means a small task as the students will face off against 580 teams from across the GLOBE for the awards and top spots at the VEX High School World Championship.
Also awarded the Volunteer of the Year Award for the TN State Middle School Tournament was Ms. Kalli Sluder who has volunteered as the Head Ref at several regional tournaments in East TN.
Mentor of the Year at the High School State Tournament was Mr. Craig Sluder who volunteers many hours working with the high school robotics team.
The program is now seeking community support for its upcoming trip.
Anyone interested in supporting or donating to the JCHS Robotics team World Championship fundraiser is encouraged to please go to https://johnson-county-high-tn.ed.co/jchs-robotics.
Questions can be sent to Kasi Dishman at kdishman@jocoed.net at Johnson County High School

Hansen wins Belgard Project Excellence Award

This normal backyard transformed into a great outdoor space. Photo by Ricky Hansen

By Meg Dickens

Mountain View Nursery Hardscaping Manager Ricky Hansen recently won the Belgard Project Excellence Award for hardscaping work on an outdoor space in Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Hansen specializes in hardscaping and irrigation at Mountain View Nursery. He is a Tennessee Tech graduate, ICPI (Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute) Level II certified installer, NCMA (National Concrete Pavement Institute) certified SRW (Segmental Retaining Wall) Installer and certified commercial pesticide applicator. Hansen continues to attend classes to maintain and attain additional certifications. He is also a Belgard Certified Contractor, Belgard Premiere Power Manufacturer and the winner of Belgard’s Most Outstanding Project Award in 2016.
“It gives me a sense of pride knowing that the things I’m creating are getting recognized,” said Hansen. “ It makes me want to keep going and do a better job.”
These types of projects are a team effort between the hardscaping and landscaping teams. The hardscaping team consists of Manager Ricky Hansen, Technician Logan Church and Technician John Kidd. The landscaping team consists of Manager Cody Graybeal, Foreman Tony Church, Technician Nathaniel Meyer, Technician Daniel Branch and new member Jesse Compton.
Owner Harvey Burniston, Jr. is involved in all aspects.

The hardscaping crew takes two classes per year on walls and pavers for certification purposes. The classes put the crew on Belgard’s radar. Hansen sent in photos of this project for recertification, and district Belgard officials chose the project as a winner from there. Mountain View Nursery falls into the Southeast category competing against professionals in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Georgia.
The property is designed to function as three separate living spaces. There is a patio and kitchen area, a fireplace and relaxing area and a place to gather. According to owner Jackie Kimball, the area continues to grow even more beautiful. “Everything they did was up to the highest standard,” said Kimball. “They were very professional and mindful of their surroundings. You can tell they are truly trying to please the client.”
Hansen is currently working on a project near Highway 321. He plans to help with Mountain View Nursery’s new location afterward. The Home and Garden Center will occupy the old Wiley’s Body Shop location on Highway 421.The nursery and display gardens will be around back. Customers will be able to walk around and see what they might want. Employees can then make suggestions based on experience.
Burniston plans on opening the new location on April 1 to the right of the Garden Barn. There is no reason to fear conflict between the two businesses. Garden Barn’s Bob Pardue suggested the space to Burniston. They plan on the two businesses complimenting each other.
Customers will be able to buy their flowers and vegetable plants from the Garden Barn and then head to Mountain View Nursery to look at fruit trees, shrubbery and landscaping ideas.
Keep an eye out for a possible grand opening this April. As Hansen says “always go bigger and better.”

Keywood Animal Clinic to conduct breeding soundness test

By Sarah Ransom

The University of Tennessee/Tennessee State University is partnering with Tri-State and Keywood Animal Clinic to conduct a Breeding Soundness Exam for local cattlemen on Saturday, March.
The exam is scheduled to be held at the Johnson County Livestock Association Cattle Handling Facility located inside the Chamber Park in Doe.
Suzanne Robinson from Keywood Animal Clinic is coming to conduct the bull’s breeding soundness tests.
Testing bulls can help reduce the risk of spreading unwanted diseases or genetic issues and help increase higher pregnancy rates to help with cattle production and increased profit.
According to the University of Tennessee’s Extension Veterinarian, Lew Stickland, “failure to properly evaluate bulls before and during the breeding season can result in huge economic losses…a bull’s fertility can be considered fertile, sub-fertile, or sterile.”
The cost of testing is $45.00 per bull.
However, Tri-State Growers Co-Op is providing a $10 sponsorship per bull to help cover part of the cost for testing. The testing fee is $35 per bull.
Once the test is complete, all bulls that receive a satisfactory score for breeding purposes will also receive vaccinations and deworming at no additional cost.
BVD-PI testing is also available for an additional $15, and it is a great deal for those hoping to breed their bull this season.
Tests are scheduled through the UT/TSU Extension office that can be reached at (423)-727-8161. Those interested can stop by the office, located at 212 College Street.
For more information or additional questions, please contact the Extension office.
UT Extension serves the citizens of Johnson County with educational programs in the areas of Agriculture, Family and Consumer Sciences, Community Resource Development, and 4-H Youth Development.
The office has a wealth of research-based publications, addressing virtually any issue related to the home or farm.
Johnson County 4-H is the largest youth serving organization in the county working with 900-1,000 youth annually in grades 4-12. The Mountain City
office is an outreach branch of the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture and Tennessee State University, providing research-based solutions and information to the citizens of Tennessee.
Extension is an educational organization, funded by federal, state and local governments, that brings research-based information about agriculture, family and consumer sciences, resource development and youth to the people of Tennessee.